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Protect your business from OSHA/EPA fines

Who is the EPA in Your State?

Administration of the EPA’s Residential Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992, Title X

The Feds are the EPA

The EPA operates and enforces the federal EPA regulations in a number of states, but most states have taken over enforcement of the regulations. In instances of states managing enforcement, most have taken the EPA regulations as a starting point and modified them to suit the particular needs of the communities they encompass. This means that while the majority of the state regulations will be identical to the federal regulations, there may be material differences, and those differences will be more stringent than the federal regulations. The list of states in which the EPA is still the regulatory agency includes:

Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Florida, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Wyoming

The State DPH is the EPA

As the main thrust of the EPA’s efforts have been to address the specific hazards lead presents to children, most of the state agencies have rolled their programs up under their State Departments of Public Health as a Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. Below is the list of states that have taken over regulatory management and enforcement, along with a link to the state office that administers this management and enforcement. From these links you can usually navigate to sites that discuss state-specific training requirements for lead work, as well as the state’s specific implementation of Title X.

Alabama: http://www.adph.org/lead/

Arkansas: http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/programsServices/epidemiology/Environmental/Pages/LeadBasedPaint.aspx

California: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/CLPPB/Pages/default.aspx

Colorado: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/ap/leadhome.html

Connecticut: http://www.ct.gov/dph/cwp/view.asp?a=3140&q=387550&dphNav_GID=1828&dphPNavCtr=|#47067

Delaware:  http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/hsp/lead.html

Georgia: http://www.gaepd.org/Documents/epdforms_lpb.html#la

Indiana: http://www.in.gov/isdh/19131.htm

Illinois: http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/lead.htm

Iowa: http://www.iowadnr.gov/Environmental-Protection/Land-Quality/Contaminated-Sites/Brownfields/Lead-Based-Paint

Kansas: http://www.kdheks.gov/lead/license_and_certification.htm

Kentucky: http://chfs.ky.gov/dph/lead.htm

Louisiana: http://www.deq.louisiana.gov/portal/tabid/2884/Default.aspx

Maine: http://www.maine.gov/dep/rwm/lead/

Maryland: http://www.mde.state.md.us/lead

Massachusetts: http://www.mass.gov/dph/clppp

Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-2940_2955_2983—,00.html

Minnesota: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/lead/

Mississippi: http://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/page/Air_Lead-BasedPaint?OpenDocument

Missouri: http://www.dhss.mo.gov/Lead/

Nebraska: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/puh/enh/leadpaint/leadindex.htm

New Hampshire: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/clpp/

New Jersey: http://nj.gov/health/fhs/children/lead.shtml

North Carolina   http://www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/lead.html

North Dakota: http://www.ndhealth.gov/aq/iaq/lbp/

Ohio: http://www.odh.ohio.gov/en/odhprograms/eh/lp_prev/lp_prev1.aspx

Oklahoma: http://www.deq.state.ok.us/AQDnew/lbp/index.htm

Oregon: http://oregon.gov/DHS/ph/leadpaint/index.shtml

Pennsylvania: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/lead_poisoning_prevention___control/14175

Rhode Island: http://www.health.ri.gov/leadpoisoning/index.php

Tennessee: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/swm/leadpaint/

Texas: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/elp/

Utah: http://health.utah.gov/enviroepi/healthyhomes/lead/child.html

Vermont: http://healthvermont.gov/enviro/lead/lead.aspx

Virginia: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/leadsafe/resources.htm

Washington: http://www.commerce.wa.gov/portal/alias__CTED/lang__en/tabID__515/DesktopDefault.aspx?init

West Virginia: http://www.wvdhhr.org/mcfh/lead

Wisconsin: http://dhs.wisconsin.gov/lead/index.htm